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UN experts call Morsi’s death in Egypt ‘arbitrary killing’

UN experts call Morsi’s death in Egypt ‘arbitrary killing’

An independent panel of United Nations experts has said the death of former Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi in June could amount to “a state-sanctioned arbitrary killing”. “Morsi was held in conditions that can only be described as brutal, particularly during his five-year detention in the Tora prison complex,” a statement from the office of the UN high commissioner for human rights said.
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His death “after enduring those conditions could amount to a state-sanctioned arbitrary killing”, the statement added.
Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically elected president, died on June 17 while standing trial for charges that he and legal observers said were politically motivated.
He was deposed in a 2013 military coup carried out by current President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi following a year in power.
Morsi, who belonged to the now-outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, was overthrown after a tumultuous year in power.
‘Denied life-saving care’
Led by special rapporteur Agnes Callamard and the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, the human rights experts explicitly called out Sisi’s government for rights violations in jails describing them as “intentional”.
Morsi spent nearly six years in solitary confinement where the panel said he “was denied life-saving and ongoing care for his diabetes and high blood pressure”.

The experts noted Friday that “authorities were warned repeatedly” about his deteriorating health to the “point of killing him”.

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